You can’t say that, No. 4

It’s the new he’s-innocent-because-he-took-too-much defense.

“The way the doctors have explained it to me, the amount they’ve found is an amount that’s almost impossible to have in your urine so we’re definitely behind the rider and we believe the rider 100 percent.” Lampre-Merida coach Brent Copeland on why rider Diego Ulissi couldn’t possibly have been doping using a salbutamol inhalant during his two Giro stage wins because he was apparently over-doped. Cycling News, June 25, 2014.

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Six puffs, on the other hand …

“It is important to know that salbutamol does not make you stronger … Cyclists know that you do not go faster if you take five puffs. You must understand that this is not doping.” Italian national team coach Davide Casani, explaining that Diego Ulissi’s positive result for the banned substance salbutamol, which improves breathing and oxygen uptake in aerobic sports, isn’t really doping. Wieler Fits, June 26, 2014.

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Well, perhaps not “absolutely.”

“Absolutely inexplicable.” Lampre team doctor Carlo Guardascione, at a loss to explain how Diego Ulissi’s salbutamol levels were almost double the allowed limit. Cycling News, September 12, 2014.

END

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6 thoughts on “You can’t say that, No. 4”

    1. An inside joke … a joke that no one gets … a joke that’s not funny … an old joke … etc.

  1. geeze, just how much was Ulissi inhaling?!

    Inhaled salbutamol is WADA-legal to a maximum 1600 micrograms over 24 hours. 100 micrograms per puff is typical, so he was taking over 16 puffs over the course of a 5 hr race?! (the cyclingnews article “100 ng puffs” — nanograms — seems in error).

    1. I usually take between 5,000 and 6,000 puffs per hour. Mr. Puff-n-Stuff is what they call me.

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