Some people

About a month ago I stopped to help a fellow flailer change his flat. By “help” I mean “stand there and watch.” It was an amazing flat. As he was stuffing the new tube into the tire, I looked at the one that had flatted. It had been patched at least twenty-five times. “Waste not, want not,” I thought, looking also at the tire with the threads showing. “Wonder how long that’s gonna last?”

He aired up the tire and then pfffffffffft.

“Crap,” he said. “That was my only spare tube.”

“No prob,” I said, handing him my spanking new one. I hardly ever get flats because I always replace my tires when they start to wear. It’s expensive and I’m cheap, but the tiny little strip of rubber holding you in a precariously delicate balance on just this side of oblivion, that’s a place worth spending a few extra bucks. The main use to which my tubes get put, it seems, is on other people’s bikes, which is cool. Pay it forward, right?

I grabbed his second tube that had flatted as he was airing up the tire with my new one. This tube, too, had about twenty patches on it and looked like it had been used as slingshot rubber back in the 50’s. He finally got going, and that was that. When I saw him the next day he never said anything or offered me a replacement tube, which I shrugged off because even though I’m a petty bastard, I’m not that petty. But it’s not like he was one of those people you never see. He’s around all the time.

It started to get under my skin after a few weeks every time I saw him I’d yell out, “Where’s my tube?” He’d pretend not to hear and would always dash off, which guarantees that I will never, ever, ever stop asking about that tube. In fact, if he tried to give me one I’d refuse it so I could keep up the heckling.

About two months ago I was going down a hill on a coffee ride and a gal who gets everyone’s share of flats double flatted. She is a flat magnet; two giant thorns, one in each tire. Her tires are always new, and so are her tubes, but she only had one spare. I gave her mine and we continued on. That was a Sunday, and I usually see her on the Thursday Flog Ride.

That Thursday she wasn’t there, but a few hours after the ride she sent me a message. “Did you get it?”

“Get what?”

“The coffee and the tube!”

“What coffee? What tube!”

“No way!” she wrote. “I put a pound of good coffee beans and a new inner tube at the top of Via la Cuesta this morning with a note for you; left it there about 6:20 and rushed home because I couldn’t make the ride because I had to take my daughter to lifeguard camp.”

“There was nothing. Just a bunch of broke down old farts coughing up spit, blood, teeth, and shards of broken ego.”

“Some bastard stole it,” she wrote. “It had your name on it.”

“It’s the thought that counts,” I wrote back, smiling, not only because she’s such a good person but because she cared so much that the one small favor get repaid.

Today when I went out to get the mail there was a package for me, and inside the package, this. And there weren’t any patches on that inner tube, believe you me.

tube

Then I thought about the guy I see every weekend who’s madly pedaling away from a six-dollar inner tube. One person pedaling away, another eagerly pedaling towards.

END

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20 thoughts on “Some people”

      1. Exactly. There is though, a limit to cheap.

        My only “How does this apply to me?” response is that when I had both of my daughter’s in college at the same time, I barely had enough pocket change to keep my bike on the road. No money for picking up the tab at the coffee shop, no money for buying anything along the ride, no money for post-ride meals.

  1. Paying back the thoughtfulness of others and keeping an attitude of gratitude should always be the Rule on the Road. Even if that thoughtfulness isn’t repaid it’s still worth it.

    You’re a good man Seth!

  2. Are you still a BCCClub member Seth ? The club policy on tubes is ” Give a tube to non-member in need and the club will give you a replacement tube “.

  3. I’m in with donating a tube to a fellow cyclist in need. However doing such would leave me vulnerable. Is there anywhere in the peninsula one can ride up to and buy a new tube?

    1. I always give up the tube. My chance of flatting is small. Fellow flailer’s chance of getting anywhere without a tube is zero.

  4. I now carry two CO2 cartridges since the day a friend “borrowed” one. So now I have one for me and one for a friend. But only one tube.

  5. SIX dollars for a tube? That’s just crazy talk. I’d stuff my tire full of grass and pine needles first.

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